Mechanical Engineering

Chairman: Dr. Zuruzi Abu Samah, Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Ph: +966 11 215 8853
E: zsamah@alfaisal.edu

Web address: https://coe.alfaisal.edu/en/me-home
 

General Department Information

Mechanical engineers are concerned with the design, development and manufacture of machines/mechanical parts and components. In modern times, good mechanical engineers are trained on a strong foundation of theory, practice and interdisciplinary innovation. Subjects in mechanical engineering overlap with various other engineering branches such as aerospace, architecture, biomedical, civil, chemical, computer, electrical, electronic and communication, industrial, instrumentation, materials, metallurgical, nuclear and petroleum engineering to varying amounts. But mechanical engineers do more than just work in these core engineering sectors. The field has continually evolved and in recent times mechanical engineers have been heavily involved in numerous advanced fields such as acoustics, automatic control, biomedical, chemical processing, combustion, computer-aided design, condition monitoring, environmental control, food processing, renewable and nuclear energy, mechatronics, manufacturing, maritime industry, nanotechnology, power generation, plant layout, process simulation, water desalination, quality control, consultancy and human resource management.

A mechanical engineer should have a strong interest and academic background in mathematics and physical sciences, concern about the quality of life and products, a desire to put ideas into action, curiosity about how things work and how to improve their performance, and good communication skills. Engineering design is the backbone of Alfaisal University's mechanical engineering (ME) program which is reinforced with the fundamental physical sciences, including engineering mathematics, physics, chemistry, materials, applied mechanics, mechanics of materials, structural analysis, fluid mechanics, automatic control, thermodynamics, fluids mechanics, fundamentals of electrical and electronic engineering, manufacturing processes, mechatronics, machine design, engineering management, instrumentation, safety and risk analysis, vibration and damping, computer-aided engineering and several computational techniques. Experimental work is carried out in laboratories and through small projects work at all levels of the program. The program also includes industry and University-based summer research projects at different levels. This is not to say that your mechanical engineering education is over, the main aim of the ME program being to provide graduates with the ability and confidence to continue lifelong education within their chosen profession.  Mechanical engineers have always been in good demand worldwide. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the world over, there is a great demand for mechanical engineers. National public and private sector companies like Saudi Aramco, SABIC, Saudi Railways Organization, KACST, universities in addition to multinational companies such as BAE Systems, Boeing, General Electric, Schneider, Schlumberger, Siemens, Thales International, and United Technologies, etc., all have constant interest in Mechanical Engineers across all specializations.

A degree in mechanical engineering at Alfaisal University will give you the knowledge and advanced interdisciplinary skills to work in the design, development and manufacture of products in Saudi Arabia and worldwide.

                                                        

Classes

ME 201: Materials Science and Engineering

This course provides an overview of the fundamental principles of materials science and engineering that are essential to an engineer. The broad areas covered are structure of crystalline solids, mechanical behavior of commonly encountered engineering materials and phase transformations. Students will encounter the inter-relationship between processing, structure and performance and how this affects design and materials selection in engineering practice.

ME 203: Applied Mechanics I: Statics

The course teaches: fundamentals of forces and moments in 2 dimensions and 3 dimensions, moment about a point and about an axis, equivalent force systems, vector operations, 2D and 3D equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies, free body diagrams, center of mass, analysis of beams, trusses, frames and machines, and dry friction.

ME 205: Introduction to Computer Aided Design

The course teaches computer-aided design of mechanical systems, and includes the preliminary design, analysis, and documentation of a mechanical system. This will include first and third angle projections, solid modeling and the use of commercially available CAD software.

ME 206: Thermal Fluids Engineering I

The course teaches thermodynamics, pressure, temperature, heat and work, properties of pure materials, first law, closed and open system, second law, heat engines and cycles, including fluid mechanics, conservation laws, boundary layers, laminar and turbulent flows, pipe flows, incompressible one-dimensional flow, external flows, ideal flows, compressible flows, heat transfer, conduction, convection and radiation.

ME 206 L: Thermal Fluids Engineering I Lab

Laboratory experiments dealing with thermodynamics, pressure, temperature, heat and work, properties of pure materials, first law, closed and open system, second law, heat engines and cycles, including fluid mechanics, conservation laws, boundary layers, laminar and turbulent flows, pipe flows, incompressible one-dimensional flow, external flows, ideal flows, compressible flows, heat transfer, conduction, convection and radiation.

ME 208: Mechanics of Materials I

The course teaches mechanics of deformable bodies. Topics covered include concepts of stress and strain, classification of materials behaviour, stress-strain relations, generalized Hook's law. It also covers applications to engineering problems: members under axial loads, torsion of circular rods and tubes, bending and shear stresses in beams, combined stresses in beams, transformations of stresses, deflection of beams, buckling and thin-walled pressure vessels.

ME 208 L: Mechanics of Materials I Lab

Laboratory experiments dealing with materials and structures, beam bending, buckling and torsion, material and structural failure, stress, strain, and heating effects.

ME 305: Manufacturing and Workshop Training

The course teaches an overview of modern manufacturing technology, materials and their manufacturing characteristics, Casting, Mould design Tools and fixtures, Cutting machine tools (turning, milling, drilling, broaching etc., abrasive machining processes), Joining, assembly, Manufacturing costs, design for manufacturing, Welding, EDM, Laser Machining, Industrial Manufacturing processes (metal forming, forging, extrusion, rolling), Metrology, Inspection methods and quality control.

ME 305 L: Manufacturing and Workshop Training Lab

Laboratory experiments dealing with modern manufacturing processes such as machining (turning, milling, drilling, broaching etc., abrasive machining processes), forming processes (metal forming, forging, extrusion, rolling) and assembly processes such as welding.

ME 306: Instrumentation and Control Engineering

The course teaches an introduction to the design of feedback control systems. Topics include the properties of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, the root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods. These concepts will be applied to a variety of mechanical and aerospace systems throughout the course.

ME 306 L: Instrumentation and Control Engineering Lab

Laboratory experiments dealing with feedback control systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, the root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

ME 307: Thermal Fluids Engineering II

The course teaches applications of thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid mechanics to the design and analysis of energy systems. Topics include energy analysis, power and refrigeration cycles, studies of laminar and turbulent flow including heat transfer in free and forced convection, in channels, and over surfaces, heat transfer, including fins, forced and free convection, boiling and condensation, radiation heat transfer, heat exchangers, multi-mode heat transfer, compressible flows in pipes, ducts, divergent and convergent flows, sonic and supersonic flows.

ME 307 L: Thermal Fluids Engineering II Lab

Laboratory experiments dealing with applications of thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid mechanics to the design and analysis of energy systems. This includes energy analysis, studies of laminar and turbulent flow, heat transfer in free and forced convection, in channels, and over surfaces, fins, forced and free convection, boiling and condensation, radiation heat transfer, heat exchangers, compressible flows in pipes, ducts, divergent and convergent flows, sonic and supersonic flows.

ME 308: Advanced Manufacturing Processes

The course teaches the integration of design, engineering and management disciplines and practices for analysis and design of manufacturing enterprises. The course emphasizes the physics and stochastic nature of manufacturing processes and systems, and their effects on quality, rate, cost and flexibility, process physics and control, design for manufacturing and manufacturing systems and a team project where the students design and build elements using mass-production methods to produce a product in quantity.

ME 308 L: Advanced Manufacturing Processes Lab

Laboratory experiments reinforcing with integration of design, engineering and management disciplines. Students will learn about rapid prototyping using 3D printing tools and CNC technologies including using software to convert engineering designs into toolpath information.

ME 310: Mechanical Component Design

The course teaches the creative design process via the application of appropriate physical laws and learning to complete projects on schedule. Topics include synthesis, analysis, design robustness, machine elements, manufacturability, idea generation, estimation, concept selection, visual thinking, communication, design and analysis, design for manufacturing, professional responsibilities and ethics.

ME 310 L: Mechanical Component Design Lab

Laboratory experiments reinforcing the creative design process. Students go through the design process including idea generation, estimation, concept selection, visual thinking, communication, design and analysis, design for manufacturing, professional responsibilities and ethics.

ME 311: Applied Mechanics II: Dynamics

This course teaches basic principles of kinematics and kinetics of 3D particles and planer rigid bodies. It establishes and develops the analytical skills to solve dynamics problems based on application of basic principles such as Newton'92s laws of motion, concepts of work and energy as well as impulse and momentum, and force and acceleration.

ME 312: Mechanics of Materials II

The course teaches an introduction to mechanical behaviour of engineering materials and the use of materials in mechanical design. The course emphasizes the fundamentals of mechanical behaviour of isotropic and anisotropic materials, as well as design with materials, including elasticity, plasticity, limit analysis, fatigue, fracture, creep, three-dimensional stress and strain problems and the selection of materials for engineering design.

ME 312 L: Mechanics of Materials II Lab

The course focuses on experiments reinforcing concepts in mechanical behavior of engineering materials and the use of materials in mechanical design, including elasticity, plasticity, limit analysis, fatigue, fracture, creep, and deformation in pressurized cylinder.

ME 314: Vibration and Damping

The course teaches single-degree and multi-degree of freedom systems. Topics covered include undamped and damped free and forced vibrations, impulse and arbitrary force response vibration, absorbers and isolators, rotating machinery fault diagnosis, modal analysis and mode shapes.

ME 315: Machine Design

This course teaches the function, design and performance of basic machine elements commonly used by mechanical engineers, such as shaft, temporary and permanent fasteners, key, thick wall vessel, etc. Students will develop skills in designing and analysing performance capabilities of these elements based on static and dynamic combined loading. The course will also cover potential topics such as part geometry, material choice, loading and environmental conditions, static and fatigue failure theories, factor of safety concept.

ME 400: Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering

The course will focus on advanced topics and recent developments in one or more of areas: control and robotics, dynamic systems, fluid mechanics, materials science and engineering, solid mechanics and structures, thermal sciences or other areas in mechanical engineering.

ME 401: Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer

The course teaches the working principles of computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer and applies these concepts using commercially available software packages used in industry. Topics include the application, analysis and limitations of design evaluation using CFD approach. The course will equip students to model real engineering problems and correlate the working principles of fluid dynamics and heat transfer using numerical techniques.

ME 403: Finite Element Modelling for Dynamic and Structural Analysis

The course teaches the working principles of the non-linear finite element method (FEM) and applies the concepts involved using commercially available software packages used in industry. Topics include the application, analysis and limitations of design evaluation using FEM approach. The course will equip students to model real engineering problems and correlate the working principles of Mechanics and Dynamics using numerical methods.

ME 403 L: Finite Element Modelling for Dynamic and Structural Analysis

Laboratory experiments dealing with the working principles of the non-linear finite element method (FEM) and apply the concepts involved using commercially available software packages used in industry, the application, analysis and limitations of design evaluation using FEM approach. The course will equip students to model real engineering problems and correlate the working principles of mechanics and dynamics using numerical methods.

ME 405: Engineering Safety and Risk Analysis

The course aims to introduce students to hazard identification, risk assessment, risk control in industrial or commercial workplace. The course will also equip students with knowledge on health, and safe work practices, recognition and elimination of health hazards, design material handling and emergency treatment for industrial accidents. Students are expected to understand different hazard identification and control methods and able to develop risk management systems.

ME 406: Mechatronics

The course teaches the acquisition of the knowledge and skills required to design and control electromechanical systems. The basic material will be covered in classroom lectures and discussions. Much of the learning will take place in the laboratory where students will learn to build and operate representative electromechanical systems. The class includes a final project.

ME 407: Heating, Ventilation, and Air-Conditioning

The course introduces basic concepts of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems (HVAC). These include: HVAC components and distribution systems, moist air properties and conditioning processes, indoor comfort conditions, heat transmission in building structures, calculation of heating loads, cooling load, duct design, fans and building air distribution, and the performance of refrigeration systems.

ME 410: Energy Conversion and Cogeneration Systems

The course introduces various types of energy conversion and cogeneration systems. These include; advanced steam power plants, gas turbine power plants, nuclear power plants, co-generation and tri-generation, internal combustion engine, and renewable energy conversion systems. The student will learn how to do an analysis for any energy conversion system. Moreover, students will learn about the regeneration, binary, supercritical, and other advanced steam power cycles. In addition, this course teaches student how to design components of the power conversion system such as boilers, condensers, steam turbines, compressors, combustors, gas turbines, and others. The knowledge about the nuclear power plants and recent technologies is covered as well in this course. Furthermore, the course gives an introduction to the power generation using the new and renewable energy sources as well as energy storage and economy of energy.

ME 412: Renewable Energy Systems

The course gives an overview of renewable energy sources including biomass, hydroelectricity, geothermal, tidal, wave, wind and solar power. And it also presents the fundamentals of different renewable energy systems with a main focus on technologies with high development potential. Furthermore, it integrates maths, engineering, climate studies and economics, and enabling students to gain a broad understanding of renewable energy technologies and their potential.

ME 414: Introduction to Compressible Flow Turbomachinery

The course introduces various types of compressible flow turbomachineries and describes their fundamental working and design concepts. This includes; turbomachinery classification, apply dimensional analysis and similitude to turbomachines, basic governing equations for turbomachines, Euler equation, centrifugal compressors, axial flow compressors and fans, radial and axial flow turbines.

ME 416: Automotive Engineering

This course teaches the fundamentals of Internal Combustion engines, its classifications and applications, as well as deign and operating parameters. Topics include the thermodynamic analysis of fuel-air cycle, firing order, concept of combustion process in SI engines, Scavenging and design aspects of SI engines, supercharging and turbocharging, lubrication system, engine cooling system and engine heat transfer, fuel injection system in SI engines, Compression Ignition (CI) engines, conventional and non-conventional fuels in SI and CI engines.

ME 418: Water Desalination

The course aims to introduce students to fundamentals of water desalination. The course provides an overview and classification of desalination techniques such as single and multiple effect evaporation, vapor compression, single and multi-stage flash distillation, reverse osmosis, hybrid processes. It will also cover potential topics such as resources and needs for desalination, dual purpose power and desalination plants, desalination powered by renewable energy sources. Other topics such as economic analysis and brine discharge management may also be presented.

ME 419: Product Design and Development

This course will introduce students to thought frameworks, tools and methods for product design and development. The course will teach students a set of product development procedures that can be practiced in multidisciplinary teams. Topics include opportunity identification, product planning, identifying customer needs and specification, concept generation, selection and testing as well as designing of environment and manufacturing. The course will include projects-based assignments.

ME 420: Advanced Visualization and Simulation

This course will introduce students to use computer-aided packages in the product design and manufacturing process. Students will be exposed to CAD/CAE/CAM packages which are used in the industry to perform analysis and evaluate performance of engineering products and to optimize manufacturing processes. The course will be hands-on and will involve ample project-based activities along with lecture-based instructions.

ME 435: Undergraduate Research in Mechanical Engineering

Students participate in supervised research with a faculty member. Supervised research can be: 1) independent research undertaken by the student (thesis, independent study), or 2) assistance on a faculty member'92s research project. Students must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise him/her as an assistant on an existing project or as the author of an individual project. The student and the faculty supervisor will complete and sign a research contract which will be turned in to the chair of the Industrial and Mechanical Engineering Department. Drafting the contract will allow the student to develop ideas about what should be accomplished and what the faculty supervisor'92s expectations are. All academic requirements are at the discretion of the supervising faculty member. Students should agree on a plan for the semester with the faculty mentor before the research begins. The plan should include academic requirements, the basis for grading the experience, and a plan for student/professor meetings for the semester. It is the student'92s responsibility to report progress and seek guidance when needed. Students are expected to be active and reliable participants in the research experience.

ME 495: Mechanical Engineering Capstone Project I

The mechanical engineering curriculum culminates in a two-semester capstone sequence undertaken in a small team or, in case this is not possible, individually, under close supervision of an academic staff. Students typically choose a project that aligns with their interest. The capstone project is the foundation of the student'92s engineering portfolio for application to industry or graduate school. In the first semester, students enrol in ME 495 during which student teams identify scope of the project, formulate specifications, develop conceptual solutions and designs, perform concept analysis and engineering analyses to arrive at a final prototype design.

ME 496: Mechanical Engineering Capstone Project II

ME 496 is the second part of the two-semester capstone sequence. Students working individually or in a small team under supervision of an academic staff will be expected to continue and complete prior work initiated in ME 495. Student teams proceed with physical realization, validation and testing of their designs. Student teams are expected to deliver an engineered, validated and tested product or prototype. Scaled models may also be produced for projects involving large structures. While a successful outcome is expected, it is not required as the focus of capstone courses is on students'92 learning.